YouTube and Local TV in Community Journalism Experiment?

The future? Well, at least one version of it.  YouTube and KGO-TV in San Francisco (where YouTube is headquartered) are teaming up.    
Here’s how YouTube describes the marriage:  “We’re joining forces with our local ABC station, ABC7 (KGO-TV), to launch the ABC7 uReport powered by YouTube. ABC7 will use YouTube Direct to collect news footage from people in the San Francisco Bay Area. Residents of the Bay Area are invited to document the news and events happening where they live, work and play, and to submit those videos via YouTube Direct to the producers at ABC7. The team at ABC7 will feature newsworthy videos on television (Channel 7 in the Bay Area), on their website (ureport.abc7news.com), and on their YouTube channel (youtube.com/abc7news).”

Build Things That Make your Reporting Better

New York University professor Jay Rosen recently wrote:

It’s incumbent upon journalists to level with people. If that means backing up to say, “Actually, it’s hard to tell what happened here,” or, “I’ll share with you what I know, but I don’t know who’s right.” This may be unsatisfying to some, but it may also be the best an honest reporter can do.

Rosen was speaking in terms of political reporting, but his analogy is a good one for all types of stories you might cover. Frustrated with the conflicting estimates of how much oil is leaking into the Gulf of Mexico? The PBS News Hour opened my eyes to a new way to tell the story: