What We Can All Learn from Paul Harvey

Harvey knew the space between two thoughts can be as powerful as the thoughts themselves.
Harvey knew the space between two thoughts can be as powerful as the thoughts themselves.

Silence is golden.  It earned Paul Harvey a $100 million dollar, ten year contract at age 82! This morning, the microphone is silent.  And Paul Harvey would have wanted it that way.

For more than 50 years, we were greeted by Paul Harvey’s rich baritone speaking voice that carried such authority:  “Hello, Americans!”,   he’d boom into the microphone.  “This is Paul Harvey! [pause] Stand by for news!”

And those damn pauses got us every time. We knew they were coming. But they were irrestible.

Harvey knew the space between two thoughts can be as powerful as the thoughts themselves.

But his genius, and his signature, were those pauses. Attention-getting in their simplicity, but so seductive in their promise.

Contrast that with the fast-talking, speed equal energy, over processed newscasts we are subjected to 24/7  and you can see why the world is a little less clear this morning.

You could not half -listen to Paul Harvey. He wouldn’t let you.  He set you up. [pause] made you wait [pause] drew you in  [pause] and by that time you couldn’t wait to hear “the rest of the story”.

We need Paul Harvey pauses.

Not only in our broadcasts, but in our very lives.  So today, pause, and listen. Before you respond to someone today, pause to consider what they’ve said.  Pause and listen for the sounds of nature, a karma or spiritual thought you may have missed.

And, [pause] to remember the man who never left us without a [pause] and a “Good Day”.

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2 thoughts on “What We Can All Learn from Paul Harvey

  1. Maria Espisito, from LinkedIn Group “Those in Media” responds:
    “”Before you respond to someone today, pause to consider what they’ve said.” That one line sums up the biggest problem with most forms of communication – nobody is listening. Have you every watched the series of postings on a site like Twitter? Everybody is so busy trying to get noticed and retweeted, that they never respond to someone else’s tweets. Even in face-to-face communication, I have noticed an emerging trend of people talking over one another just so they don’t have to relinquish the floor. Even if they do stop, they don’t listen to what has been said before they start talking again. Have we gotten so hungry for that fifteen minutes of fame, that we have forgotten how to savor the pauses?”
    Maria Esposito

  2. I don’t know where you’re coming from. I listened to Paul Harvey and was repulsed. (Pause) Not only by the reactionary nature of his ideas, (pause) but by that crazy staccato delivery that left so much dead air that sometimes I thought his mike was intermittent!

    More to the point, are we so easily seduced by sizzle rather than steak that we applaud a “great” delivery without regard to what’s being delivered?

    I for one appreciate great oratory over mannered stylistic pauses, and I much more appreciate sensitive and intelligent and nuanced ideas over black-and-white simplistic thinking left over from the Neanderthal Ages of Wayback America.

    Sorry to burst your bubble.

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